A blog for students on the FDLT at the University of Northampton

at Leicester and UN

April 16, 2019
by Jean
0 comments

A new online course from DLAB!

Our team from the University of Northampton would like to invite you and your staff to join our free online course on What if the sea level rises? Exploring language and culture in a future setting. This course has been developed as part of a European funded project, ‘Digital Learning across Boundaries’, that brings together teachers, student teachers and lecturers in Norway, Denmark, Belgium and England to connect classrooms, and to explore and share technology-related themes.

This is a fantastic FREE resource for primary and lower secondary teachers. It includes case studies of lessons and an international online community sharing ideas. We hope you can join in to develop and share your own ideas on our themes of survival, communication and sustainability. 

The course runs for one week starting on May 6th and will remain on our website for teachers to dip in and out of as much as they want.  

We hope that this is of interest. You can find out more and sign up here: 

http://dlaberasmus.eu/courses/what-if-the-sea-level-rises-exploring-language-and-culture-in-a-future-setting/

 

Alongside this free opportunity, I would like to let you know that we are recruiting for a new Postgraduate Certificate in Digital Leadership, starting on 20th May 2019. This is a one-year, part-time, fully online course that leads to 60 Master’s credits and can form part of an online Masters pathway open to an international audience. It is intended to develop both subject and leadership expertise, and is designed to accommodate complete beginners as well as those with some existing knowledge in the field. You can find more information here: https://www.northampton.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate-certificate-in-digital-leadership

 

Do contact me if you have any queries about either of these courses:

helen.caldwell@northampton.ac.uk

All best wishes,

Helen Caldwell

(And the DLaB team at the University of Northampton)

February 2, 2016
by Jean
0 comments

Spot the station!

stationISSFollowing on from last week’s post about Tim Peake’s mission on the International Space Station (ISS) from this week we have the opportunity to view the ISS as it moves across the UK each day.

The NASA website ‘Spot the Station’ allows us to check the times when the ISS will be moving overhead.

stsYou can enter your location to check the dates and times to look out for the ISS.

If the sky is clear you can see the ISS tomorrow (Wednesday 3rd February) you’ll be able to see the ISS going overhead at 6.47pm. On Thursday 4th you can see it at 5.55pm and 7.30pm and on Friday 5th February at 6.37pm and 8.13pm. You’ll need to keep an eye on the weather forecast.

When you go outside to look the NASA website says: “The space station looks like an airplane or a very bright star moving across the sky, except it doesn’t have flashing lights or change direction. It will also be moving considerably faster than a typical airplane (airplanes generally fly at about 600 miles per hour; the space station flies at 17,500 miles per hour).” (NASA, 2016)

There’s more detail  on the Meteorwatch website here

There’s potential for learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics through exploring the ISS from the earth. You could learn about astronomy and weather forecasting.

Reference

NASA (2016) What am I looking for in the sky? web page [online] Available from: http://spotthestation.nasa.gov/sightings/view.cfm?country=United_Kingdom&region=England&city=Northampton#.VquXdFLLmNk [Accessed 29/01/16]

 

 

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