Moggies against terror

 

Brasmble may not look as if she is politically motivated, but she wishes to express solidarity with the protesting cats of Brussels!

Bramble may not look as if she is politically motivated, but she wishes to express solidarity with the protesting cats of Brussels!

I have always been fond of cats. Whilst there was a time during which I favoured dogs as pets, I now recognise the great individuality of cats, many of whom appear to be far more intelligent than myself, and have a much more relaxed attitude to life. Indeed Bramble, the cat who kindly allows us to share her home here in Northamptonshire (there is little doubt that this is how she sees the situation) spends much of her time seeking the sunniest and most comfortable resting places in the house, and seldom exerts herself beyond the casual walk to her bowl in search of food. I sometimes contrast this with my own lifestyle, but if I consider this for too long it can become depressing.

Often when I am working at home in the study, Bramble will spread herself comfortably on the sofa, occasionally opening one eye to ensure that I am still slaving over a keyboard before returning to her slumbers. I used to think that she chose this position because she liked my company, but have more recently come to believe that she is keeping an eye on me to ensure that I don’t disturb the order of the room which is, I suspect, arranged just as she likes it.

I haven’t written about cats before on this blog, generally believing that they have only a tenuous link to education, save for some excellent literary felines as exemplified in the verses of T.S. Eliot, or several stories by Rudyard Kipling, and that they probably have even less impact upon children’s rights. However, yesterday I found myself initially amused, and then pondering more thoughtfully on the role that cats were playing in the day’s news. This all began with a headline on the BBC website that stated:

“Brussels Lockdown: Belgians tweet pictures of cats to confuse Isis terrorists.”

Not being a user of Twitter, simply because it takes me too much time to master the technology associated with this simple blog, I must confess that I have only minimal understanding of how it works. But I was certainly intrigued by the headline and couldn’t resist reading further. It would appear that as Brussels began its third day living with the highest level of alert in relation to potential terrorist activity, a request was made by the police and other authorities not to disclose details about police activity through the use of social media. Recognising the sense of this request, this has apparently initiated a response by Twitter users, and not only those from within Belgium, who have now set about showing their concern and determination to defeat the terrorists by posting pictures of cats on their accounts. Goodness knows that the situation in Brussels is anything but a laughing matter, but it would appear that the human spirit is able to rise above even the most dire of circumstances.

Apparently thousands, if not tens of thousands of cat images have now been posted on people’s Twitter accounts (I understand that this is usually referred to as “tweeting”, but in view of my usual association of this term with birds, it seems inappropriate to use it on a blog about cats). Many of these photographs can be found on news sites and from the pages of newspapers. Some of the images simply show rather cute kittens frolicking at home. Others have been portrayed more creatively, in poses of mock surrender, or armed with guns or bombs or hiding in a vast range of receptacles.

I would not normally give articles such as this too much attention, but having wasted several minutes smiling at a number of the pictures, I found myself reflecting on an article I had read in the previous day’s Guardian written by the excellent Marina Hyde, in which she argued that one way of confronting those who wish to inflict terror on our communities is through the use of comedy to mock them, and show them up for the mindless cowards that they truly are. Thinking about what Marina Hyde had to say I was soon in accord with her ideas, remembering how some of the great comedians of the past have helped us to see the stupidity of those who try to impose their warped view of the world on others.

Charlie Chaplin’s 1940 film the Great Dictator, used comedy to highlight the despicable nature of Hitler, Mussolini, antisemitism, and the Nazis with great effect. Cartoonists all over the world such as Steve Bell, Satish Acharya, Laxman and Jeff Stahler have helped to expose corruption and enabled us to laugh at the perpetrators. Whilst satirical television programmes like “That was the Week That was,” and “Spitting Image” have tackled political cant and pomposity with many a belly laugh. Now it would appear that thousands of largely unknown people are using cats to good effect to highlight the futility of terrorism.

I tried showing some of the pictures to Bramble yesterday evening, and asked her for a suitable quote (yes I know – but there’s no harm in trying). At first she feigned some slight enthusiasm, but eventually curled herself back into a comfortable position turning her back on me with barely disguised contempt. The only message that she seemed to convey was something along the lines of – “I spend my whole life making a mockery of you, but you are not bright enough to notice”.

Comedy is dismissed in some quarters as having little of substance to offer in our interpretation of the world or the ways in which we might confront its challenges. Perhaps we should reconsider this view and allow the cats to continue in their excellent venture to scoff at those who would do us harm

May the pictures below raise a smile!

Laid back cat. Just wake me up when it's all over!

Laid back cat. Just wake me up when it’s all over!

Comedian cat - mocking anyone who wants to disturb his peace

Comedian cat – mocking anyone who wants to disturb his peace

six shooter cat! Part of the cat peace keeping squadron

six shooter cat! Part of the cat peace keeping squadron

Para-military cat. Keeping the cats of Brussels safe

Para-military cat. Keeping the cats of Brussels safe

Boozy cat - it's enough to drive a cat to drink!

Boozy cat – it’s enough to drive a cat to drink!

Book cat - educating himself to understand what it means to live peacefully in a diverse world

Book cat – educating himself to understand what it means to live peacefully in a diverse world

 

Teachers – at the forefront of challenging ignorance and bigotry.

Diversity and difference is a cause for celebration and an opportunity for learning - for those who are prepared to open their minds and leave their prejudices behind.

Diversity and difference is a cause for celebration and an opportunity for learning – for those who are prepared to open their minds and leave their prejudices behind.

Last evening I had a very sad and disturbing conversation with a friend who teaches in a school in a city not very far from here. Angela (not her real name) has worked in the same primary school for the past fourteen years and is totally committed to her pupils and their families. Angela is a good musician and she is involved in a wide range of after school activities for children including organising a school choir, a recorder group and a drumming class. In addition, she helps to run a parent and child activity group for a couple of weeks during each school summer holiday. Angela’s husband is similarly involved in a number of initiatives to support children and families, in what is one of the poorest parts of the city in which they live.

Angela tells me that at the end of the school day yesterday an unusually large number of parents, mostly mothers, who had come to collect their children, came to see her to have a brief conversation. Most, she tells me, had the same message that they wished to convey. “Please”, they said, “make sure everyone knows that we are good people, and we are disgusted by the events that have taken place today in France, these people do not represent our community.”

As the parents were conveying this message, Angela was completely ignorant of the murder of journalists and cartoonists that had taken place earlier in the day at the offices of the satirical publication Charlie Hebdo in Paris. She tells me that she was at first confused, but as the significance of what had happened became apparent she then felt angry and slightly nauseous. Being largely unaware of the events, after all she had been in class all day, she was at a loss as to what she could say.

Angela teaches in a school where more than fifty percent of the children come from Moslem families. Her school is located in a part of the city where Moslem’s make up a majority of the local neighbourhood. It is a peaceful and well respected community that contributes greatly to the socio-economic and cultural well-being of the area and the city as a whole. Of late however, many who live in this district have become increasingly afraid of anti-Islamic sentiments that have been intensified both by terrorist activities in various parts of the world, and by the fanning of flames by a number of xenophobic individuals and organisations.

Today, as on every school day, Angela will continue to give her best for the children in the school. She will, as always be available for families, and will demonstrate the same enthusiasm for the musical after school activities that she runs. The saddest part of Angela’s situation, she tells me, is that good, caring and dedicated parents feel the need to apologise to her, and reassure her that they do not subscribe to the hatred shown by a tiny minority who are prepared to murder, maim and terrorise those who do not share their warped view of the world. Angela tells me that over her years of working in this school she has come to appreciate the warmth and affection shown towards her by parents of children attending this school. She and her colleagues have been thankful for the support given to the school by members of the local community, and regard those of the Moslem faith as kind, considerate and caring. Of course, she tells me, there are a few parents who are not supportive and do not want to participate in the life and activities of the school, but isn’t this true of schools everywhere? This is not a factor dependent upon religious belief.

Listening to Angela’s recounting of her after school conversations, it was impossible not to empathise and to appreciate her concerns and those of the families with whom she works. It was equally difficult not share in her sadness and anger that a small minority can have the effect of demonising the  peaceful majority who espouse a religious belief. Though anger will have only a negative impact and is part of what the terrorist tries to achieve. Today Angela and her colleagues will try to reassure parents and children as they arrive at the school gates. It should not be necessary, but today, possibly more than on others, they will be vigilant in listening for any unkind or inappropriate comment that might be made towards a child in school. She does not anticipate that there will be any real need to behave differently from the ways that she might on any other day, but she is none the less concerned that there may be difficult moments.

Good teachers like Angela care about their children and do their best for them regardless of their background, culture or religion. They look for the good that exists in all children and do their best to support them in their learning and social development. This is the way that all professionals who are committed to children act, and will continue to behave, despite the provocation of a few misguided bullies and thugs who through a misrepresentation of faith attempt to terrorise the populace. Education should be free of fear, must promote the exchange of ideas, celebrate difference and diversity and aim to create a more inclusive and respectful society. If this is achieved the perpetrators of atrocities such as those committed in Paris yesterday will be seen for what they are – acts of cowardice and totally unrepresentative of anyone other than a bigoted minority.

The actions that will be taken by Angela and her colleagues, and by teachers in classrooms and on playgrounds across the world today will have far greater impact than ignorant men armed with guns could ever have.

Nous sommes Charlie!