Teaching old dogs new tricks!

Young teachers at work - and note how their older students are enjoying this!

Young teachers at work – and note how their older students are enjoying this!

Training and encouraging researchers in education is often a difficult task. There are as many ways of conducting and interpreting research as there are researchers. Approaches to training therefore need to offer ideas in a manner that is both flexible and challenging. So yesterday, having been asked to present ideas about moving the educational research agenda forward here at the university, my colleague Philip decided we needed to pursue new avenues.

The easy option would have been to use an “expert” researcher to deliver a training session focused upon some form of innovative data collection approach or theoretical framework, or to introduce the latest piece of software designed for analysis or interpretation. However, this is an approach that would surely alienate some colleagues and be declared “old hat” by others. Thus it was decided that we should adopt  a strategy that would hopefully surprise and unite even the most hard bitten researchers.

Had you visited the School of Education at the University of Northampton yesterday morning you would undoubtedly have noticed the enthusiastic children who were engaged in activities around the building. School pupils in their bright blue uniforms were sitting at tables, and others on the floor, working with academic colleagues on a range of tasks. Producing posters, designing slogans and logos and generally participating in discussion and debate, these enthusiastic individuals worked hard all morning to educate the adults around them. Their task – to tell the adults in their groups what research means to them, and to inform us about why they believe that investigation is an important element of learning.

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As the morning progressed they identified key words that reminded us of why we began our journey as teachers and researchers. Curiosity, finding things out, discovery, digging for information, exploring new ideas – these were just a few of the expressions that emerged from their work. At the end of the morning they presented their drawings and key words to the gathered audience. They did so with confidence and authority and with good humour and logic. They explained their reasoning and taught us much about the importance of investigation, and the value that we should be seeking to provide in our work as teachers and researchers.

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At the end of the day everyone who had attended today’s training sessions had a broad smile. There was a general acknowledgement that a group of eight and nine year old children had made us think about research in ways that the acknowledged “experts” could never have achieved. I am sure that my memories of the day will largely dwell upon the enthusiasm with which children were able to address issues which we may well have over-elaborated, and made difficult through our dubious levels of sophistication.

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In my experience listening to children usually helps us to see the world in ways that we might have forgotten. The wisdom emanating from a group of school pupils today may hopefully have assisted us in developing as better teachers and researchers in the days to come. The opportunity we had to learn from these children is far more profound than anything I have to say – so I hope you just enjoy today’s pictures. With many thanks for permission given to use these by the children and staff of Oakway School.

An attentive class, sitting up and paying attention!

An attentive class, sitting up and paying attention!