“We were told…”

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Generalisations and stereotypical labelling can be the bane of a teacher’s life. I can guarantee that any teacher reading this blog will be able to recall expressions used about children that whilst having no evidence base have become part of the folklore of education. I can personally recall many of these, some of which I found particularly irksome – “gypsy traveller children always have poor school attendance records,”“boys with ADHD are always going to be trouble in class.” I’m sure that you could add your own equally irritating examples to these. The saddest feature of such expressions is that they can become self-fulfilling prophecies when teachers or others begin to believe them and adjust their expectations accordingly.

Recently, my good friend Savitha Ravi an outstanding school principal from Bangalore sent me a link to a video recording (see below) which reminded me of a number of occasions when I was a head teacher and parents would tell me of the predictions made about their children. A typical example can be related from the parents of one of my former pupils, a young lady with Down’s syndrome, whom I often meet in the local town. They recall how when she was just two years old they were told by a senior medical officer that their daughter would probably never talk, and that she would most certainly need an intensive level of care for the rest of her life. Having been given this professional information they went home and prepared to adjust their lives to ensure that the necessary high levels of provision would be in place for the remainder of their daughter’s years.

Looking back on this these highly committed parents are now able to smile and reflect on how they, and their daughter have proven the professionals to be wrong. Their daughter is now married, has successfully managed a job and lives a largely independent life with her husband (about whom similar predictions were made) about a hundred miles from her parents. When discussing this situation they recall the many stresses that they have experienced as parents and particularly those which they feel were caused by well-meaning but sometimes ill-informed professionals.

The story of these parents is not so different from many others whom I have known and who often use the expression “we were told that…” in recalling their experiences. “We were told that he would never walk,” – “we were told that children like Dean are impossible to toilet train.” Some of you will have heard similar tales beginning with the expression “we were told…” without a doubt.

Whilst I am not being critical of my professional colleagues who may have used such expressions in the past, after all they are probably basing their predictions upon many years of experience, I am concerned that the potential for lowering expectations can have a detrimental impact upon the education of children. It takes a confident and determined parent to confront such a diagnosis and to defy the wisdom of the professional or challenge their assertions.  One such parent Kristine Barnett is portrayed in the video clip forwarded to me by Savitha.

Kristine is the mother of Jacob who at an early age was diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum. When Jacob was still an infant she was told that her son might never be able to speak and might never be able to tie his shoelaces. She describes how when she was given this prognosis she was “completely devastated” and that it was “pretty scary.”  She recalls that when told these things “I believed them. They were my doctors and therapists and people that we trusted.”  During the interview seen in the video she never challenges the professionalism of any of the medics or teachers with whom she dealt, but what she does demonstrate is a confidence in her personal intuition as a parent and her profound belief in her right to choose a path for Jacob. Kristine describes the decisions she made to take Jacob away from the specialist schooling that was being provided for him and to give him opportunities alongside “typically developing” children. She goes on to tell a tale of her son flourishing and revealing an extraordinary gift for scientific thinking, and an ability to learn abstract concepts and apply these in ways that other much older individuals never manage.

Jacob, at the age of fifteen, is working alongside well established scientists in Toronto and has demonstrated the potential to become a leading physicist and researcher. In the video we see that he is an engaging young man who is certainly articulate and very focused upon his scientific studies. I must confess that when he talks about quantum physics he leaves me well behind in terms of my understanding. At the end of the interview Jacob tries to reassure listeners that mathematics and science is really quite simple and that “anyone can do it.” He certainly demonstrates a belief in himself that is much greater than many predicted for him.

I am not, of course suggesting that every child given a diagnosis of autism is a potential genius. What does concern me is that for so many parents expectations are lowered at a very early stage of their child’s development. Professionals do have to err on the side of caution and we should accept that raising false expectations may be as damaging as predicting low attainment. However, it takes an exceptionally strong parent like Kristine to challenge the authority of the professionals and to provide an alternative view of the world for their child with special educational needs.

The video (to which there is a link below) provides a much better analysis of the challenges faced by Kristine and the accomplishments of Jacob than I could possibly achieve in this short blog. Sadly, I have no doubt that I will continue to hear parents using the expression “we were told…” but hopefully I will also find more who have chosen to raise their own expectations and prove the professionals wrong.

http://www.waldorftoday.com/2014/03/this-mother-tore-off-labels-and-nurtured-her-son%E2%80%99s-hidden-genius/

 

4 thoughts on ““We were told…”

  1. I think many of us reading this blog can sympathize with families who are given grim predictions for the future of their children by professionals. What a thing to hear! We professionals should know better. Such predictions serve little positive purpose and, to borrow a line from my paediatric physiotherapist wife, nobody has a crystal ball.

    • Hi Tim,
      You clearly have a very wise wife. I am always wary of the expertise we carry as professionals. Whilst we hope it is a force for good it is a potent tool and needs to be handled with care.

  2. Hi, Richard, In China these days, there are talks about Autism. In 2012, the number of autistic children in China reached 1.64 million. The number is ever increasing these years. Many parents of the autstic children were told by educational professioners to take their children home as they do not fit with ‘typically developing’ peers. Some parents have to lock their children at home, or to marry them at the age of 14 (a report today about a 14-year-old girl was arranged to marry a man in his 30s). As autism awareness is relatively low in China, autistic children and their families are having a difficult life. A report in 2012 wrote about a 9-year-old autistic boy who was locked at home died when he tried to climb out of a window in order to go to school, which rejected him. If he lived and grew, he could be another scientist. Nowadays, people in China are beginning to raise their awareness about autism. However, according to a recent Central China TV news, 75% of the autistic children have not got proper medical care and education provision.

  3. Hi Mary. Your posting is very sad. However, it is not only in China that such challenges exist. Bear in mind that here in the UK attitudes such as those you describe were not uncommon a few years ago. As more individuals, such as yourself and our colleague Meng Deng strive to raise awareness of these issues in China, things will gradually change. It will take time but hopefully the more we can engage people in conversations through a forum such as this, the more attitudes will shift.

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