Tate Modern: Language, Learning and Litchenstein

Sometimes we can underestimate the power of art to promote dialogue and language development. After a thought provoking day at the Tate Modern Art and Language Workshop, working with the enthusiastic multimedia artist Emma Hart my understanding of the power of art to provoke words has spiralled. The relationship between thought, words, art and interpretation is compelling; without a doubt exploring contemporary art with children could influence literary development and fuel enthusiasm and creativity.

Here are some great activities experienced on the day that you could use to engage children with works of art: the value being to make the work encountered accessible for all and to give pupils a voice!

Before and After Thoughts…

Observe the work encountered. What piece of work did the artist make prior to this one? How? Why?

What came next? Can you draw it, act it, explain it?

Word Worm…

As a group create a line encompassing the work. Each person says one word to create a sentence about the work… what meaning is evoked? Word play and power evoke your imagination.

Verb or Verbalising…

Explore how the artwork makes you feel on viewing. In pairs observe the artwork, one person writes down the verbs the other partner is vocalising to describe how they are feeling in the space. Remember to vocalise verbs that you are feeling/ encountering- trembling, questioning, sweating rather than those about the artwork. Look inwards- art may have the ability to evoke a response in us. Explore language: adjectives, similes, metaphors  and have fun!

Emma Hart and the Tate team really inspired the way that I will approach my own teaching uniting art and language highlighting how important social collaboration is in this process; so thank you also to all participants who took part and have changed my thinking.

Whaam! 1963 by Roy Lichtenstein 1923-1997

Another highlight was the Roy Litchenstein exhibition, a must see! I was blown away by the diversity and quantity of the work he created, famed for his pop art the exhibition really brought to light the vast influences from advertising (again showcasing the power of word play), movements such as Art Deco and the work of a whole range of influential artists- was Litchenstein inspired or making a statement about their testimonials? The viewer can decide….