Rebecca Heaton on Art and Design Education

Investigating cognition in the creative arts.

By

Roman Textile Art: A partnership between Croughton All Saints Primary School and The University of Northampton

Pupils from Croughton Primary School worked with first year non art specialist BA Primary Trainees to develop their printing skills in a collaborative workshop Northampton University trainees designed. The experience was designed to give first year trainees the opportunity to try out their printing skills with children in a scaffolded environment, whilst enriching school pupils with textile skills they may not otherwise have access to. The dual learning experience was successful in developing pupil, student, teacher and lecturer cognition.

Pupil cognition developed in different ways, the school children were able to make connections with their topic work on Roman life developed in school and apply this knowledge to the print work they were completing, many discussions were heard relating these experiences during the practical workshop. The finished artefact above models the children’s thoughtful making, the collaborative print shares a contribution by each child sharing their learning surrounding Roman design and the printmaking process.

The trainee teachers involved in the workshop also drew connections in their own learning, students had to articulate their awareness of the pedagogy behind print making to the children in order to assist them with creating their own print designs. The trainees had to think through both visual and verbal languages in order to model to the children how to create a successful print.

The class teacher accompanying the children commented that “the stimulating university environment and the one to one teaching was inspiring for the children and engendered their aspirations.” The teacher recognised his own cognition had developed because planning provision of this type was highly beneficial for learners to be able to embed and enhance their understanding of artistic processes and historical developments.

As the lecturer who organised this experience I experienced cognitive development by thinking in a medium, I was tasked with mounting the finished canvas print on a felt background. Whilst using the sewing machine to complete the task I became aware of how I was problem solving through the making process, I was estimating sizes and designing the background whilst making. It was a task that I had to complete quickly and was required to think in action, a continual process of reflection occurred. The making experience was capturing the movements of my mind as an artist and I was transitioning between identities of artist, lecturer and teacher.

IMG_3670

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Skip to toolbar