Vision Statement

vision“What is the purpose of primary education?” This is a question that has been posed in many lectures and seminars which has made me aware that in this rapidly developing world it is essential to prepare children for the unknown; becoming adaptable, autonomous learners with transferable skills in order to become successful citizens. Why? Because we do not know what these children are going to be when they leave school; as time changes, so do occupations. One thing that is evident is that technology is continuously developing and becoming increasingly popular. Doyle (2002) acknowledges that ICT is used by everyone for a wide range of reasons; it is part of our daily lives with children being in increasing contact with it (Berson and Berson) and playing a fundamental role in shaping a child’s education and development. Potter and Darbyshire (2005) advocate the importance of preparing children with the skills and knowledge they will require to function within an expanding and evolving technological world.

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As of September 2014 a change was implemented to the Primary National Curriculum; children are now taught ‘Computing’ which was formerly known as ICT. ‘These proposals included one to replace the existing, outdated ICT curriculum with a new computing curriculum with a greater emphasis on computational thinking and practical programming skills, to help England retain a competitive edge in the global digital economy’ (DfE, 2013, p.2).  Poplawska states ‘the discipline of information technology should be given “equal emphasis to computer science”, something she feels the new curriculum’s ‘Computing Programme of Study’ does not do. In order for England’s education system to compete globally it is suggested that the children need to be taught both elements; programming and ICT. However, Grantham recognises that although the subject name has changed, the curriculum content for ICT has not been removed and highlights that ‘the old ‘control’ strand links nicely with a lot of the programming and algorithms objectives!’

Rachael, Jenn and I worked in collaboration to prioritise Our top 3 benefits for using ICT in the classroom: enabling access to the curriculum for minorities, increasing collaboration and communication and enabling publishing and audience. So let me explain exactly what we mean. A range of technological resources such as IWBs, internet access, floor robots, audio recording devices, cameras (just to name a few) can be embedded into any area of curriculum (explored in an earlier post) to make learning more exciting and interactive (ELG PSED – Dispositions and Attitudes); encouraging collaboration and therefore communication too (ELG PSED – Making Relationships; CLL – Communication). Bartlett (2003) advocates the use of ICT suggesting that it is an invaluable resource for encouraging talk amongst the pupils and also states that interactive, online resources can be found to support any subject or topic. Technology can also support children with SEN or those who speak EAL via specialist equipment, appropriate websites or to help the teacher differentiate activities. I have seen ICT used as rewards/sanctions for a child with autism; once the child had earned 5 stars for good behaviour, they were allowed 5 minutes on their choice of computer game. Additionally, some children may not have the opportunity to access ICT outside of the classroom therefore it is a teachers responsibility to provide these opportunities to ensure no children are excluded from these advancements.  Thirdly, technology can enable children publish their work in various forms e.g. video recording, digital books which children are always really proud of (ELG KuW – Exploration and Investigation). Additionally, teachers use ICT for processing assessment information (Haine, 2007) and also publish this for a variety of audiences e.g. staff, parents. Haine also recognises that children who see their teacher using technology will become curious and want to explore it themselves (ELG KuW – Information and Communication Technology). This is also an ideal opportunity to demonstrate how to handle technology appropriately; modelling expected behaviour and responsibilty.

I am a firm believer that technology can be used effectively to enhance children’s learning and also provide experiences that are otherwise impossible, for example: if children are learning about remote places, technology provides the link, enabling children to explore through the use of videos (ELG KuW – A Sense of Place), photographs or even connecting with other children in a different location which is an idea I explored last year. Additionally, using a keyboard to type (ELG PD – Using Tools and Materials) or apps where children use their finger to create letters reinforces phonetic awareness (ELG CLL – Linking sounds and letters) and children will enhance their problem solving skills when learning about algorithms as they will need to debug them if they do not function and fix the error. This is an essential, transferrable skill that children will hopefully relate to in other contexts; finding solutions to problems in order to overcome barriers (ELG CLL – Language for thinking).

hookICT can provide an exciting stimulus to hook children in to learning or to prompt discussion. Siraj-Blatchford and Whitebread (2003) have also found that children find ICT interesting and exciting. To illustrate this I can relate to prior school experience where I used videos on the IWB as a lesson starter or one of my favourites is to get the children to close their eyes whist listening to sound clips as this really gets their imagination working and the discussion afterwards is very high quality as they have been encouraged to think deeply.  Overall, I found the use of technology supported the children to focus on the task, facilitating higher levels of involvement and engagement in the learning (ELG PSED – Dispositions and Attitudes).

It has been recognised that ICT offers many benefits for children’s education, however, it does also pose some problems. The internet provides access to unlimited resources in multimedia forms which children can learn a great deal from. However, Wishart (2004) acknowledges that there are concerns with regards to inappropriate materials online being accessed by children. DeFranco (2011) also identified that children are increasingly putting themselves at risk by posting personal information online. It is vital that children are made aware of online safety (Willard, 2007); I would teach children about this prior to them using the internet. I explored how this could be facilitated in my post about Internet Safety last year. Pitler et. al. (2007) states that by creating a simple set of rules for expected online behaviour and practising these from a young age can prove effective. Wishart et. al. (2007) recommends the use of role play as an effective method for teaching children this concept; posing different scenarios to the children can heighten their awareness and encourage them to think of an appropriate action (ELG CLL – Communication). It is also important to heighten parent’s awareness of internet safety to prevent jeopardising the children’s safety at home. This could be facilitated by sending home newsletters or running internet safety workshops.

This blog post has demonstrated the following Teacher’s Standards:

TS1 – The safety of ICT has been acknowledged and will be practised in schools to enable a stimulating, yet safe, environment to be established.

TS2 – I acknowledged the concept of algorithms and related these to problem solving (de-bugging) which I will encourage children to practise in all areas of learning; encouraging children to reflect on their learning and take a consciencious attitude towards their work.

TS3 – I have demonstrated my understanding of how the ICT-Computing curriculum has changed.

TS4 – It has been mentioned that ICT can stimulate children’s curiosity and make learning exciting; fostering a love of learning.

TS5 – ICT can assist with the differentiation of activities to meet the needs of all children and enable some children to access areas of the curriculum which would otherwise prove difficult.

TS7 – As a teacher I will model how to use technology responsibly and set high expectations for the children.

TS8 – I have developed effective professional relationships with colleagues and discussed our group philosophy for ICT in the early years. I have explored how assessment information can be shared with parents.

TS Part 2 – Teaching children about internet safety and implementing provisions to safeguard the children whilst using the internet.

References:

Bartlett, N. (2003) ‘A picture is worth 1,000 words, for children it’s 1m’, Early Years Educator, 5 (4), pp. ii – viii.

Berson and Berson. http://www.infoagepub.com/products/High-Tech-Tots

DeFranco, J. (2011) Teaching internet security, safety in our classrooms [online] Available from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=cc7ec59e-f558-4b27-bfcd-c999a0145035%40sessionmgr4001&vid=8&hid=4212 [Accessed 10th November 2013].

Department for Education. https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/205921/ICT_to_computing_consultation_report.pdf

Doyle, S. (2002) Applied ICT GCSE. Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes

Grantham. http://swaygrantham.co.uk/computing-not-ict/

Haine, H. (2007) ‘Assessment using ICT’, Early Years Educator, 8 (11), pp. xiv – xvi.

Pitler, H. Hubbell, E. Kuhn, M and Malenoski, K. (2007) Using Technology with Classroom Instruction that Works. Colorado: Research for education and learning.

Poplawska, J. http://www.computing.co.uk/ctg/news/2280243/new-ict-curriculum-too-focused-on-development-side-of-computing-says-corporate-it-forum

Potter, F and Darbyshire, C. (2005) Understanding and teaching the ICT National Curriculum. London: David Fulton Publishers

Siraj-Blatchford, J. and Whitebread, D. (2003) Supporting ICT in the Early Years. Maidenhead: Open University Press

Willard, N. (2007) Cyber-safe kids, cyber-savvy teens: Helping young children learn to use the internet safely and responsibly. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass

Wishart, J. (2004) Internet safety in emerging educational contexts.  Computers and education. 43 (1), 193-204.

Wishart, J. Oades, C and Morris, M. (2007) using online role play to teach internet safety awareness. Computers and education. 48 (1), 460-473.

Internet Safety

You hear of so many fearful stories about children using the internet, such as: online strangers, cyberbullying and issues with protecting personal identity.

All schools have Acceptable Use Policies (AUP’s). These outline the rules for using the internet for staff and children and the children’s parents are often required to sign them. Here is an example AUP for Leicestershire schools for use with younger primary children. It has been worded appropriately for young children:

Therefore it is vital to make children aware of the dangers and also how to prevent such situations. I would be inclined to use this ‘internet safety quiz’ with children, go through it together and discuss the answers. This would consolidate the importance for being careful whilst on the internet, outlining the rules and provide the opportunity for children to ask ask questions.

CBBC offer a wide range of tools suitable for teaching children about internett safety with themes that children may be familiar with e.g. Tracy Beaker – a TV show from CBBC.

 

 

After informing children about the importance of internet safety I would leave a quiz on the classroom PC/iPad for the children to use freely, this would encourage them to continue thinking about it after the group discussion; not just dismiss it. Here is a suitable quiz at safekids.com:

Another way to approach eSafety would be to let the children watch a video, here’s one that is suitable for Early Years children:

As a teacher it will be my responsibilty to safeguard myself and the children against online intrusion. There will be firewalls and filters in place but I must ensure children are supervised at all times when online and to check any websites prior to the children accessing them. Here are 3 alternative search engines that are safer to use with children, but still require supervision:

http://safesearchkids.com/

http://uk.ask.com/?o=432&l=sem&qsrc=119&siteid=432

http://kids.yahoo.com/search

All schools require at least one member of staff to attend Child Exploitation and Online Protection training, who will then cascade this training to other members of staff.

‘Hector’s World Safety Button’ is a fantastic idea that I wish to use in my classroom. It is a free download that installs Hector the Dolphin to swim in the top right-hand corner of your computer screen. If the children, or teacher, sees something that they do not like they can quickly click on Hector to cover the screen.

 

It was recently in the news (5th Feb 2013) that children as young as five should be taught about internet safety due to the increasing exposure of onlline pornography and cyberbullying. The whole story can be read here.

The UK have a whole day dedicated to Internet Safety, I think this could have a huge positive impact on schools; teachers could plan many activities around internet safety in a holistic manner so the requirements of the National Curriculum are still being met at the same time. UK Safer Internet Centre have a great range of resources and activities for use in the classroom – free to access or dowload.

5 Quick Classroom Activities

Assembly Script

Assembly

Lesson Plan  – This is a really flexible lesson plan adaptable for use with KS1 and KS2. It covers links across the NC through PSHE/Citizenship and Literacy.

Staff Guidance

“No doubt about it — TV, interactive video games, and the Internet can be excellent sources of education and entertainment for kids. But too much screen time can have unhealthy side effects.” Kidshealth.org is an excellent website for keeping children safe and healthy whilst letting them engage in ICT activities. It’s all about getting the balance right by limiting the time that children spend on such equipment and ensuring there is adequate supervision.

Here are a few websites that are aimed at children to help them learn about eSafety:

Safe Cyberspace Surfing

KidsHealth.org/kid/watch/house/internet_safety.html

Your Online Identity

KidsHealth.org/kid/watch/house/online_id.html

Reflection:

Although I was aware of the importance of e-Safety, I was guilty of perceiving the subject as boring. But, much to my relief, it has been far from it! There is a huge range of resources ‘out there’ to help safeguard children and teachers and many fantastic materials to teach children about the dangers and how to prevent or deal with such situations. I now have a bank of websites, ideas and even lesson plans that I could use in schools, as well as being aware of the safety precautions I need to take as a teacher to safeguard myself.