A blog for students on the FDLT at the University of Northampton

at Leicester and UN

December 1, 2017
by Jean
0 comments

Record Playback

This week the year 2 students used their phones or tablets to make short films exploring terms and ideas used when learning English.

Their challenge was to define and explain their word in a one minute film using just the materials available – their own digital devices and card, paper, scissors, tape and sticks.

Below is the YouTube channel playlist where you can see what they made.

It was interesting to see that students also used resources from their devices eg sounds, music, backgrounds and screenshots as well as some of them editing their films using imovie.

When trying this out it is important for the film makers to devise a story or presentation that will explain and define the term clearly and without leading to any confusion for the viewer. Using examples, familiar contexts, stories and combining words and pictures can be useful devices here, as can devising quiz type scenarios.

This is a practical and creative way of exploring some key subject knowledge which leads to a shareable bank of short films which can then be used for revision or as lesson starters.

October 2, 2015
by Jean
0 comments

Pobble365

Every day a new picture is revealed on the Pobble 365 website. It is run by the very popular Lend me Your Literacy (LMYL) website. It emerged from Jonny Davies’s experience as a classroom teacher – he explains that he would look for a striking and extraordinary image to inspire thinking and discussion in his classroom. This is what Jonny says:

And this is exactly what happened in our classroom: each Friday morning at 09.05 I would reveal one of these unique images. As it appeared on the board, I looked around the classroom and I could see a mixture of open mouths, excited whispers and animated discussion. The children talked about whether the giant that was crawling out of the ground was searching for a companion or baying for blood, or whether the mysterious forest of eyes contained fairies or werewolves. The pictures I chose were surreal, abstract or conceptual. To the children these images were weird and wonderful, fantastic and bizarre.

Imagine your favourite children’s book: when you read it your mind becomes full of fantasy and colour as you paint a picture in your mind, bringing the pages to life. This is what these images did, even for the children who didn’t enjoy reading.

The provoked conversation gradually became filled with rich vocabulary as I channelled the children’s thinking towards describing a character or a setting. Their imaginations ran wild, and poured out onto the paper. I can still remember the goosebumps on my skin as the teacher in the adjacent classroom and I would sit down with a coffee at 4 o’clock and read through the writing produced. I thought to myself ‘this is what teaching is all about’. These are the moments that we must cherish as educators.’ (Davies, 2015, lines 20 to 46)

You can sign in to Pobble with your Facebook, twitter or Google account or by creating a sign in with your email address and a password.

Each day a picture appears and along with it some resources to help you use it with pupils. These include story starters, questions, a link to exploring sentences and other ideas. You can download the picture and ideas as a PDF or if you join as a teacher you can use the images in your lesson more directly.

Here’s a link to the picture for today, October 2nd. How would you use it?

There are many other interesting aspects to the Pobble website including, if you join as a school, being able to share your pupils’ writing and make and receive comments about it.

Comment below if you use Pobble365 or to share ideas about using pictures in learning and teaching.

 

 

Reference

Davies, J. (2015) Going Global: from Picture of the Day to Pobble 365. [online] Available from: http://blog.pobble.com/picture-of-the-day-to-pobble-365/ [Accesed 25/09/15]

 

February 6, 2015
by Jean
0 comments

A recommendation from Dom…

Dom Murphy has recommended this blog as a useful and inspiring one to follow and read:

timrylands

You can access it at this link.

Tim Rylands is an experienced primary school teacher who uses digital technology to support and inspire learning. He now works with teachers, schools and children to help them enhance learning. As you scroll through his site you can see how enthusiastically adults and children join in and you can also see some of the ideas, apps and other resources he uses.

I like this post where there are lots of links to explore – did you sir? did you miss?

trThere are lots more and you can click on each one to a brief write up then if it catches your interest you find it and explore it more fully.

 

 

 

I was interested in this one by the Children’s University of Manchester.

Its part of a bigger site based around learning at Key Stage 2, focusing on History, Languages, Art and Design and Science. In the languages section you can choose ‘words’ or ‘French’. In the words section you can explore a variety of areas such as a world languages map, a timeline of the English language, some specific activities based on adjectives, eponyms, idioms, word classes and play some games.

 

adjdetHere you can see the opening screen for ‘adjective detective’.

If you have a recommnendation of a site, blog or other online resource do add it to the comments below.

May 17, 2013
by Jean
0 comments

Key Stage 2 English tests

Last week Key Stage pupils took the Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar test for the first time.

You can read more about what Professor David Crystal thinks about the teaching of grammar to primary aged children here:

David Crystal blog posting

He analyses the test, discussing four key concerns:

1. the format of the questions

2. questions that ignore context

3. the ignoring of changes of usage

4. conflicting advice about basic grammatical terms

You might wish to read the detail of these concerns and consider how they relate to your subject knowledge and the way you support learning and teaching.

May 14, 2013
by Jean
0 comments

David Crystal on grammar

Today Year 6 children take the Spelling, Punctuation and grammar test for the first time.

Read what Professor David Crystal says about this here: David Crystal’s blog

What is your experience of supporting children to learn and use grammar?

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