The Blog

Feb 03

Josh Pulman

Posted in General Blog           No Comments »

At first this lecture seemed a little unnecessary, but had some very interesting and helpful tips. Josh is a professional photographer and has worked with many different people and been involved with photographing many different and unusual things. Although Josh doesn’t focus is skills on architecture the principle was still very similar. He is very much and ANALOGUE photographer, which means he does as much of the effects physically rather than with a computer, such as Photoshop. This lead to many little helpful tips that can be used when we ourselves photograph or when editing. Josh has been a very contactable person and I hope to use his knowledge for the future.

Feb 03

DeeThree

Posted in General Blog           No Comments »

We met a group of 3 men who have started a new company, in the last 7 months, known as Deethree. The group consists of a Model maker and visuals creator and a management officer. With the hope of expanding they intend to enter Northampton University and begin working with the students. Contact was made to the company during the week and hope of me working with them is hopefully possible in the foreseeable future. the Guys seem really interesting and determined and I hope they manage to make the move.

Feb 03

CIAT

Posted in General Blog           No Comments »

An interesting talk was given by Peter, who is head of membership for CIAT, certified institute for architectural technology. The talk was all about why we should join CIAT and the things they could do for us. I learnt that there are 3 tiers to being a CIAT member. These are student, Associate and Charted, these all need a different amount of knowledge and require you to submit a portfolio of work in 1 of 2 ways (my understanding of these is a little hazzy). We as student can’t be an associate or charted member yet but will become an associate when graduating. This will benefit us with a number of resources from CIAT to aid us as technologist.

Nov 25

Detailed list of materials-

Materials below are all foam board, the materials did have some cut outs for joints but required the measurements to allow these cut out to be made

Six 801×51 millimetres (main legs)

Two 441×51 millimetres (top beam)

Two 180×51 millimetres (top strut)

Two 250×51 millimetres (top-middle strut)

Two 330×51 millimetres (middle-bottom strut)

Two 400×51 millimetres (bottom strut)

Three 800×51 millimetres (middle beam)

Three 200×51 millimetres (supporting struts)

 

List of structural components-

Diagonal legs (outside legs)/weight bearing & span gap/high importance

Diagonal legs (middle leg)/weight bearing & span gap/low importance

Top beam structure (rectangle structure)/resisting buckling/medium importance

Weight platform and support structure/weight support/high importance

Cross struts (on legs)/support leg structure & direction/medium importance

 

While working on the bridge it was clear we needed to find a solution which could be strong but also minimalistic. This meant making a good weight bearing structure with as little materials as possible. Our bridge paced third in the ranking compared to the other bridges within the class, but out of the top three bridges we used the least materials.

image

Although the bridge held a reasonable load of 4.4 kilograms there were some obvious problems with the structure. One of the blatant problems was that the centre leg of the bridge wasn’t able to reach the side platforms at all, on either side. This makes the leg completely useless and a waste of material. This section of the bridge needed to be removed and redesign and then re-cut with more consideration on the measurement of the leg and the angle it requires to be at.

imageThe next problem with the structure was that the outer legs that were angle outwards were only just able to reach the side platforms, but it required a weight to be on the bridge. Although the bridge held 4.4 kilograms it required a kilogram to reach each side only allowing 3.4 kilograms to be added. The angle of the outer legs needs to be considered highly, not just how high the legs are elevated but also how much they span away from the centre of the structure.

Besides the initial problems with the design and manufacture of the project it held well, until the legs began to buckle mainly where the joints were. Once the structure began to buckle it only took a very small addition in weight to make it fully collapse. The material used was quite durable up to a point.imageimage There are a number of ways that his problem could be resolved such as: making the legs twice a thick, using twice as many legs but have two exactly side by side. The amount of legs can also be increased, a reasonable amount would be five although any amount can be used but it would affect the width the bridge would need to be and would require a lot more material. Another possible way to increase the legs would be to add legs at the first or second strut; this would mean they wouldn’t be the full length like other legs thereby using less material. If the width of the legs was made greater up to ten millimetres thicker this would make their strength greater. The length of the legs can also be decreased, the shorter the leg the stronger it will be, but this mean horizontal beams and struts would need to be stronger. imageThere is also the possibility of using some of the other material which wasn’t present within our project such as the string or tape. The string can be used as a structural component to stop the bridge going to either side and/or the tape can be used to strengthen joints. There was also the problem of the legs having the joint and the struts not. This either needs to be the other way around or both need joints. If both have joints then the other piece will strengthen the joint. If only the struts have joint this will make the legs much stronger but will cause the struts to be a lot weaker. Another way to strengthen struts and legs is to have a structural component that runs the length of the bridge and not just the width. This will make the bridge more rigid and if a component is placed on both sides of the legs it will make them three times as thick.

Our bridge was one of the highest; this meant that gravity would have a larger effect on the strain. There are two possible solutions for this: either makes the entire bridge lower, this would mean redesigning every section of the bridge or the weight can be lowered and would only mean an addition would be required to replace the current weight platform.image

The legs didn’t have enough support along the bottom of them. Although there were struts the bottom of the legs was where the weight affected the bridge most as it was where the contact points were. The physics of the bridge needed to be considered more. It is logical that the contact points would be more strained and so the design needed to reflect this but didn’t. The struts spacing needs to vary to reflect this physics and practicality of the structure. Adding more struts to the lower section of the legs would be reasonable, possibly even in contact with the surface to increase the contact point thereby spreading the load more.

image

The friction between the legs and struts seemed to work well but this method made the legs weaker. The struts purpose was to give the impression of shorter legs as shorter components are stronger. The struts were also required though to make sure that the legs wouldn’t just keep spreading outwards and cause the bridge to keep lowering. By moving the struts underneath this would mean the weight of the struts wouldn’t act through the legs so much but would still stop the legs going outwards. The only problem is that the friction may not be great enough to hold the struts up; this will mean joints need to be as tight as possible.

 

Overall the major downfall of the bridge was the lack of consideration given to the physics of the design, this meant areas of the bridge were weaker than others and even caused issues during manufacturing of the bridge.

Oct 29

imageimage

 

Images for the design project. The first look at what of the guard house is already there.

Oct 29

Technical Drawing

Posted in General Blog           No Comments »

During lesson we started to look at more technical drawings of buildings, including a plan view, elevation and section of a building. Each one of these technical drawings is similar to orthographic drawings but with more detail.

image

Oct 29

image

 

Final drawings of the bridge project, with dimensions. Also first use of the new logo properly and using the new A3 layout

 

Oct 14

imageimage

First time drawing the final bridge, can see a 1st angle orthographic drawing (left) and an isometric (right), both seemed to work but unfortunately incorrect due to single lines showing some of the struts. Even though this is right for the scale a small depth must be shown in order to show its not flat.

Oct 14

imageimage

First look at our surveying site today, we decided we were going to work in groups to make it easier to take measurements and speed up the process a little. We even started to look at some of the ways we can measure the building to, such as brick counting.

Oct 14

Isometric

Posted in General Blog Visual Studies           No Comments »

imageimage

A few of the 1st and 2nd lesson isometric drawings pus the homework, generally an easy concept and not a hard method for drawing.

 

Oct 14

imageimage

Some of the homework drawings for 1st angle, made a few mistakes especially with the last few but generally was alright.

Oct 14

New Uni

Posted in General Blog           No Comments »

We had our first look at the new university today. Design definitely shows potential but areas do still need improvement.

image

Oct 14

Got 2 new briefs today, one looking at a riverside building and us creating an extension for the building mainly looking at using glass. The 2 brief being is a surveying project of one of the local buildings, we have to work out all of the measurements of the buildings while also creating visuals of the building, both drawn and photographic. Both projects present a situation that can be used to improve upon our skills, and should be an interesting adventure.

Oct 07

Damage

Posted in Bridge Project General Blog           No Comments »

imageimageimage

This is the main damaged caused from the bridge being over powered by the mass it was holding. The key problem was the legs, as the weight increased they began to fold, with some eventually snapping also. But the beauty of how the bridge is design is that these legs could be re-cut and the bridge would be as good as new again, without redoing the entire thing.

Oct 07

Finally

Posted in Bridge Project General Blog           No Comments »

image

The final scores for each team, our team being ‘DARANN’ came in third place with a hold of 4.4 kg. Unfortunately at this weight the bridge structure began to bend and twist causing legs to give way and in some cases break.

Oct 07

imageimageimageimage

4 other bridges all up for the same test as we underwent. Every bridge had a difference in construction, materials used and aesthetics. All Bridges showed potential advantages and Disadvantages, with some showing similar problems and some other having possible solutions.

Oct 07

imageimage

This is the final product. An A frame bridge with multiple legs and struts to give it support. It managed to hold a bottle in our simple testing process.

Oct 06

Day 3

Posted in Bridge Project General Blog           No Comments »

So day 3 came to a close with a product that looked like:

image

The bridge had started to take shape, with the top and legs all being fitted together through a series of grooves being cut in them. These grooves enabled the bridge to support itself but much more work is needed for the horizontal struts to reinforce it’s strength plus the centre beam must be designed. The idea of this new centre beam, making it slightly different to the prototype, will mean that the load can be held lower to the ground causing less stress on the bridges legs.

If all goes well there will be a final update on how the bridge looks with a list of materials that were used.

Oct 01

imageimage

Oct 01

Posted in Bridge Project General Blog           No Comments »

imageimageimage

Just a few drawings to help visualise some of the prototypes