Decision Trail FMP

1:1 Scale Model Diary

Sandpit Base

16 17 18To create a support structure between the MDF sheets that will take the weight I produced some timber supports. I layered up some timber around the hole and drilled the hole out ready for the pole to sit in. I then placed some supports around the edge of the sandpit. This takes the height up to 100mm which is required; ready for the top MDF sheets to be fixed on.

Decision Trail FMP

1:1 Scale Model Diary

Sandpit Base

12 14 15 13In order to make the sandpit base I needed to build the material up to 100mm depth. So I had 5 MDF circle cut out; one for the bottom with a cut out ring on the top to allow material to be bent round and three for the top. The three on the top gave a gap on the top for the lid of the sand pit and the underneath with a gap to bend material round. To create the round edge and sand pit inner I used 3mm aeroplane plywood and cut it to  80mm to give me the height I needed.

Decision Trail FMP

1:1 Scale Model Diary

Brackets and collar

9 10 11To support the two table tops I needed a bracket to screw into the table and a collar that screws into the pole for the brackets to sit on. I had these made on the lathe so that they were to a high standard and so the collar would be the same size. I also had a top cap made that would sit flush with the top table and hide the pole once assembled.

Decision Trail FMP

1:1 Scale Model Diary

Table Top

7 8As the table is for children I wanted the edges to be rounded off so there weren’t any sharp edges. I used a router to round off the top and bottom of both table tops. The centre and top tables were now ready for sanding and painting.

Decision Trail FMP

1:1 Scale Model Diary

Table Top

4 5 6I then used the edge of the MDF circle as a guide on the band saw to cut the excess timber off around the outside and used the disk sander to ensure the timber and MDF match. To cut the hole through the timber I used a 35mm hole saw on the pillar drill. Then I glued and nailed the second MDF sheet down with the holes lined up; this created the full depth of 35mm for the table tops. These steps were done to produce 2 table tops 1 for the centre desk and 1 for the top desk.

Decision Trail FMP

1:1 Scale Model Diary

Table Top

1 2 3To make the table top I had two 500mm diameter circles laser cut out of 6mm MDF for the top and the centre shelves; with a 35mm hole cut out ready for the table pole. I then cut 8 pieces of timber at a 22.5 degree angle so that they would fit around the outside of the circle making an octagon shape. I then used some timber to place over the hole and across the octagon. This would give the table top support while building up the depth of the wood. I first glued all the pieces in place and then used nails to hold all the pieces to the MDF sheet.

Decision Trail FMP

Bracket Detail

The bracket needed to support the table and to allow the table tops to rotate was explored.

Bracket drawing 2 Bracket drawing

 

The support brackets for the centre and top table have been developed further to fit in with the design of the table.

The drawing shows the idea of having a bracket fixed to the table top and collars above and below.

By having the longer depth for the bracket it means the table won’t be able to bend as the pole runs through that length. It spreads the weight and pressure out more as well which will prevent cracking of the surfaces. The table top with the bracket fixed on will be the component that rotates.

To support this bracket is a bush underneath that is fixed to the pole; this will allow the table top to sit on it. Then there is a collar above the table top that simply stops it from being lifted up.

The bracket for the top table would be the same but the top collar would need to be slightly different as the pole needs to be hidden at the same time. To do this a plug style collar will be inserted into the top that sits flush with the table surface. The plug would have to be fixed to the pole so that it doesn’t prevent the table from rotating.

Decision Trail FMP

Test Rig 2

I needed to figure out exactly how I was going to make my table tops for the 1:1 scale model of my final design; so I made a second test rig to see whether it would work. This would also give me a rough idea of the timescale and amount of materials required.

test rig 2test rig 2a

The test rig shows how I used 6mm sheets of MDF and pieces of timber to build up the depth I needed for my table tops.  I used 6mm MDF and then layered timber around the edge of the circle by cutting the pieces to a 22.5 degree angle. Then I cut the excess timber off from around the edges and nailed the second MDF circle on the top. By using this method it means I don’t need to use solid wood which would add a lot of weight and expense to the model. This gave me an understanding on how I would make my final and model and roughly the time. It took me about 1.5hours to make this table top.

Decision Trail FMP

Developed Concept

While thinking about what toys I wanted to incorporate into the table design I decided I wanted to include a sand pit. Sand is used in Play therapy as an expressive toy as it allows a child to play freely with full control of the outcome. So I decided that the base could include a sand pit; by putting the sand pit at the base of the table it also helps to solve the issue of weight. The sand pit will give the table enough weight at the base to stop the table from falling over when the table tops are opened.

sand pit solid works 2

The image shows how the table design would look with the sand pit at the bottom; so the sand pit would have a lid so that the table top can still be used. So you can see the size of the table looks different which means the storage box and seat heights will have to be adjusted as well.